My Blog

Posts for category: Injury

By Dr. Steven Miller
June 30, 2020
Category: Injury

Dislocated toe fractureBroken toes are common and can be very painful. They typically result from a traumatic event such as falling, stubbing the toe, or dropping something on the toe. One may feel a “pop” or “crack” when the bone breaks. Common symptoms include pain, throbbing, bruising, swelling, and redness.

If you suspect that you have a broken toe, you should make an appointment immediately. For most people, a combination of taping and protective footwear is sufficient. 

X-rays help determine if broken bones need to be reset. The attached images demonstrate closed reduction in our office without surgery (the x-rays were taken 15 minutes apart). 

If a deformity cannot be corrected easily, surgery may be needed. Broken bones that are not properly positioned, immobilized, and protected may advance into a painful nonunion.

If you sustained a toe injury, please call (847) 675-3400 right away to schedule an assessment.

By Dr. Steven Miller
February 04, 2019
Category: Injury

Orthopedic walking bootOrthopedic boots, also known as removable short leg walking boots, are an effective alternative to casts for various injuries and after surgery of the ankle and foot. Obvious advantages of these boots include ease of application, ability to perform range of motion exercises, and hygienic reasons.

Driving with a boot is not recommended. I have warned many patients that the boot can get entrapped by the accelerator and/or brake pedal. One such episode occurred in Canada. The driver, recovering from foot surgery, collided with a tree and suffered a serious spinal cord injury.

There are no standardized guidelines indicating when a person can resume driving after an injury or surgery. Evaluations such as the brake response time are not perfect estimators of driving ability since there are many more obstacles and distractions on a road compared with a simulation.

The Clinician’s Guide to Assessing and Counseling Older Drivers, 3rd Edition, was published with support from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration of the U.S. Department of Transportation. (The first two editions were titled The Physician’s Guide…) The main goal of this guide is to help health care practitioners prevent motor vehicle crashes and injury.

If you have think you need a walking boot or other treatment for your foot or ankle, please call our office at (847) 675-3400 or click here.

By Dr. Steven Miller
August 30, 2018
Category: Injury

Tom Cruise stuntThere may be a misconception that (except for stunt performers) employment in the film and motion picture industry is safe. Two recent high-profile ankle fractures call attention to the risks that even lead actors face.

In April 2017, Nicolas Cage was injured on the set of “211” in Bulgaria. Four months later, Tom Cruise broke his ankle while performing a stunt for "Mission: Impossible - Fallout".

The five most common types of injury are strains, sprains, fractures (broken bones), contusions, and lacerations, based on an analysis of workers' compensation claims.

One reason for lower injury rates during the last decade is that some risky stunts have been replaced with digital effects. However, unscripted action adventure shows (reality TV) reversed this trend, for obvious reasons.

The Producers Guild of America has a collection of websites as part of its Safety Initiative, to recognize and implement safe practices on film & television productions.

By Dr. Steven Miller
December 25, 2017
Category: Injury
Tags: feet   fracture   car   dash  

Picture of feet on dashboardEven low-speed collisions can create severe injuries. If you ride with your feet on the dash and you're involved in an accident, the airbag (which deploys around 200 MPH) can propel your knees into your face.

Example #1: "The airbag went off…I was looking at the bottom of my foot facing up at me." Her ankle, thigh, arm and nose were all broken by the impact. "I can't do my career…I can't stand more than 4 hours at a time."

Example #2: Her knees smashed into her face. Her left eye socket and cheekbone were broken, as was her nose. Her jaw was dislocated, a tooth cut through her lower lip and she would lose her spleen. Both feet were broken and compressed, and would eventually end up nearly 2 sizes smaller than they were before the crash. Her left pupil would remain dilated, her hearing permanently altered, and her memory impaired.

Example #3: Passenger suffered multiple facial injuries, lost two teeth, and a ceramic forehead was implanted. “I kneed myself in the face and it was like an explosion.”

Kick up your feet and relax…as long as you are not in the front seat of a vehicle.

By Dr. Steven Miller
April 25, 2016
Category: Injury
Tags: injury   ankle   child   trampoline  

Trampoline“Trampoline ankle” most often occurs when two or more people are jumping on a trampoline together.

When two people are bouncing out of sync, such that one person is falling while the trampoline bed is ascending, the forces on the body are dramatically increased.  It is worse if the two individuals are different sizes. The impact can equal falling from a window onto solid ground.


This high-impact effect has caused serious growth plate injuries in children.  More than a quarter of trampoline injuries resulting in broken bones.

This injury can occur on any type of trampoline: round backyard trampolines with safety netting and protective padding, competition-grade equipment, and the wall-to-wall kind found at trampoline parks.


If you or a loved one suffered a foot or ankle injury, please see us quickly at by scheduling an appointment today. Call (847) 675-3400 or go to www.skokiepodiatry.com/appointment.html


[You can read real-life stories by clicking here.]